Author

Scott Michael Dunn

Scott Michael Dunn has 4 articles published.

Dan Steadman’s Film “Proximity” Hits Wehrenberg Theaters.

in Midwest Filmmaking Profile/Pop Culture by

Circling back from an interview in February of this year, Dan Steadman has completed his recent project entitled Proximity. This latest Steadman movie premiered in Jacksonville, IL earlier this year, which is the hometown for Proximity actor Jackie Manker. Currently, it is scheduled to play in several local Wehrenberg theaters in Greater St. Louis.

We caught up with Steadman to discuss what’s happening with Circa87.

“Two years ago we auditioned 1300 people in Wehrenberg Theatres. Over 400 of those people have played small roles in our last 5 projects. 3 actors won lead roles in Proximity – Sandy Sparks, Meg Davis, and Cody Heuer. So the auditioning really leads to great casting discoveries. It’s so exciting to see how far those actors have come in the past two short years. Even more, the actors who take the workshop get much bigger opportunities on a weekly basis. I want to grow the company with those who invest in it — not just people who self-servingly show up for the shoot dates and red carpet premieres. This is something we’re all building together.” Shared Steadman

Recently, as the Circa87 2016 Actors Workshop completed in June, Classes will be pick up from January to June next year – here’s how to get involved.

“We will be filming “The Racket,” a full length feature film this October with members of the class in lead roles. Some supporting roles will be cast in our open call casting sessions, happening next weekend, September 2 and 3, at all four Wehrenberg locations showing “Proximity.” Actors who audition may download the sides from our website, or prepare their own 2 minute monologue.” Shared Steadman’s publicist, Ethan McDaniels.

Get your tickets for Proximity, audition for The Racket and check out the press release for more information and how to get involved.

Proximity – Open Casting Call – Press Release

Proximity - Movie Poster

**

Take a look at the previously featured article published on 2016/02/06

Midwest Filmmaker: Dan Steadman

by Scott Michael Dunn @scottmdunn

BMnYw2S2

Dan Steadman: shaking up the community with his focus to develop, drive, and promote talent in the Midwest. Hollywood certainly gets most of the credit when it comes to filmmaking, with New York following close behind and Atlanta determined to catch up. But Steadman fully believes that the St. Louis metropolitan area is a perfect location for sitcoms, movies, and live theater. Not only is he talking this talk, but there is no doubt that Dan Steadman has dedicated his talent, passion, and career to walking the Midwest walk.  After moving here from LA, he developed a substantial following and became determined to give back to this community by providing opportunities for actors to fulfill their dreams. For example, his movies, Belleville and Proximity, saw the casts walking a red carpet for their respective premiers and being interviewed by local radio and TV stations. Fortunately, for the multitudes of acting talent in this area, this will happen again! Steadman has developed workshops that will provide not only in-depth guidance in the acting craft, but also opportunities for future roles.

Steadman founded Circa87, and actors can enroll in talent workshops available every Saturday for the next few months, and gather more information about additional opportunities at www.circa87.com. Steadman shared his personal story with us:

How long have you been in the industry? What kept you pushing forward and did you have immediate success?

I’ve been in the industry since 1987 – just about 30 years, which seems like a long time for someone who’s only in his early 40s. But I started as a teenager, producing TV in Michigan. Originally I was in front of the camera, as a clown. The next series I did, I started to hide behind puppets. By my third project, I quickly learned that storytelling was my drive. I quickly lost the performance bug and started to fall in love with discovering talent and putting it on screen. Writing and directing became my passion, and still is, nearly 30 years later.

How do you support your projects financially when it seems the toughest battle in this industry is funding?

That is the toughest battle. I think the secret is to devote far more time marketing than doing the “fun” stuff. I hate marketing, but part of being a professional is to do the things you hate doing. This year, the acting classes I’m teaching for six months will help fund the sitcom and the movie I’m shooting this year in the Midwest.

images

How do you feel about the talent available locally?

I moved here from Los Angeles due to the high quality of talent here. My first film, “Belleville,” starred St. Louis actress Cooper Show. I hired her off of her fantastic demo reel, even without an audition. She killed the part of the antagonist in that film, and was rewarded in Beverly Hills with a Best Supporting Actress win at the American Movie Awards for her role in our film. Another actor in “Belleville” is Antonio St. James. He was a new actor with a magnetic talent. He came in and auditioned for me at a banjo shop in New Athens, IL (no joke – I didn’t have an office for casting, so the fine folks at the Bluegrass Shack) let me use their space. Antonio was immediately written into my film and he has since gone on to book speaking roles in the film “Gone Girl” and on top notch TV shows “Empire,” “Chicago PD” and “Shameless.” That’s the kind of talent we have here. It was enough to make me move.

What’s the newest project and do you have a teaser for us to promote it?

The latest project is “Proximity,” which is continuing to roll out in theaters across the Midwest. It’s a romantic comedy we shot in St. Louis, Belleville, and Centralia, IL. I’m very proud of it. It was a stage play I wrote in Los Angeles about eight years ago with my writing partner Rajeev Sigamoney. I’m so glad we’ve finally gotten the chance to turn it into a movie.

What role did you play in Belleville, Proximity, and now the newest project in motion?

I wrote and directed “Belleville.” I directed and co-wrote “Proximity” with Rajeev Sigamoney and will be writing this Fall’s movie with him, as well. I’m flying out to California in May to finish it with him. Then I’ll be directing that film in September, with actors from my 2016 Actor’s Workshop.

How are you recruiting talent for these projects

We’ve auditioned 1300 people in the Midwest and over 400 of them have landed roles. Now it’s time to focus on those who are the most serious. That’s, in part, why I started the acting workshop. I want to devote my time and attention to actors who really want to make a go of this profession. If they are willing to come to a weekly class on Saturday for six months, I want to invest in them and make sure everyone gets some kind of speaking role in the Fall movie.

Most importantly, how did you get Adam W. to play a role in Proximity – baseball to the movies isn’t unheard of but I bet that played a role in increasing your audience?

Our producer Kathy Kaiser knew his family, and that’s how we approached the Wainwrights. The whole family was part of it — his daughters, his wife, and even his then-unborn daughter (if you squint really hard). Yes, getting a celebrity on board always helps, of course. That’s how our culture is rigged. I used to make TV pilots and films with famous folks (Melissa McCarthy, Octavia Spencer, Sean Hayes, etc) and that excites audiences. But really, a good performance is a good performance – whether it comes from a famous person or an unknown. Just look at Antonio and Cooper! (previous answer)

How does it feel to have your projects play with all the lights and red carpet. I’ve seen some of the pics of wide grinned, local talent but it must feel like an accomplishment to have a full house and a big screen presentation?

A full house is certainly an accomplishment, of course. The marketing of all that is challenging for me — exhausting, even. But for me, the red carpet premiere events are thrilling for two reasons. I get to tell a story to a willing audience. That’s a near-impossible feat in this day and age, with the fractured audience consuming media, with everyone on their cell phones, and with attention spans at an all-time low. The second great joy of a screening is watching all these deserving Midwesterners walk a red carpet, all glammed up, and get their much-deserving moment in the spotlight. Watching people have so much fun and feeling special makes all the behind-the-scenes effort, worth it.

For more info check out Circa87

Follow on twitter here.

If you like this then check out Always Late TV.

Midwest Filmmaker Profile: Doveed Linder

in Midwest Filmmaking Profile/Pop Culture by
Doveed

Midwest Filmmaker Profile: Doveed Linder

by Scott Michael Dunn @scottmdunn

Doveed and Barry

Another contributor to local filmmaking in Greater St. Louis is Doveed Linder. He has marketable success, with an earlier project that was sold to a notable Hollywood studio. Linder has another feature film (anthology) in motion and it is very close to completion. He has never feared progress as he embraces every new opportunity by jumping in with both feet. His focus and determination represents his success. With a culturally diverse background and a very interesting cinematic perspective and professional direction, Doveed Linder is an extraordinary individual. From experience, his direction moves talent to the next level and forces the emotional contribution to become personal and real. He also maneuvers that discipline into his boxing training.

“That movie was an action/western movie called “Defiance”, which was picked up by Lionsgate Films. That was my first feature film…”

https://movielala.com/people/doveed-linder/videos

“The Box” is on the way to completion along with his boxing training. There doesn’t seem to be much that can be done to deter this gentleman from contributing to the entertainment industry. It is best to join or get out of the way as he climbs a metaphoric ladder: boundless and success driven. Check out his movie “Defiance” released in 2002 and his book about boxing, The Modern Era, Vol 1.

Stl TV Live interview with Doveed Linder

Boxing: The Modern Era Vol 1

Let’s start off with who you are and where you are from geographically, ethnically. Do you feel you’ve had an advantage in life? 

I was born and raised in the suburbs of St. Louis, Missouri, first in University City and later in Ladue. I come from a half Jewish, half Catholic family, not particularly religious either way. My family growing up was middle class, perhaps upper middle. We didn’t live extravagantly, but I always had presents on Christmas and on my birthday. If I wanted to play a sport or do a certain activity, I always could. I guess you could say I had advantages that a lot of people in the world don’t have. I think the biggest advantage I had was that I had the freedom to pursue all of my interests, specifically filmmaking which isn’t considered a practical path. Instead of going to college and getting a degree, I started making movies with the intention of building a career as a writer/director of motion pictures. This was something I had wanted since I was five years old and my parents were supportive of that. They never suggested that I should take a different path.

“The owner of the gym asked me if I would work with some of the neighborhood kids a couple days a week in exchange for waiving my gym dues. A couple of days quickly turned into six days a week”

You are currently a boxing trainer and that has an interesting twist to your life story. Would you elaborate on where that all started?

Doveed and RaymondIn the late 90’s, I started to become a big boxing fan. From there, I learned to box and had a few amateur fights. In 2009, I moved to Los Angeles and started dabbling with boxing writing, eventually writing a boxing book that is coming out later this year. So, my passion of the sport has led to my involvement in a number of different ways. As a trainer, it started in 2004. I was working out at a boxing gym on the North Side of St. Louis. The owner of the gym asked me if I would work with some of the neighborhood kids a couple days a week in exchange for waiving my gym dues. A couple of days quickly turned into six days a week and I ended up training amateur fighters and putting them in fights. After a year of that, I had to stop and find a way to support myself. I became a personal trainer at a gym in Clayton called Sweat. My niche, of course, was boxing instruction. There were a few occasions along the way where I would work with somebody who wanted to fight, so I would spend a little extra time with them and get them to that level. But I wasn’t what you would call a “go-to guy” for people who want to get in the ring, nor am I now. Right now, I train one boxer who is about to make his professional debut. I Doveed and Demetriusknew him from the amateur days and we were always friendly over the years. I ran into him at an event a couple of years ago and he asked me if I would work with him. I’m very happy to do it, but I’m doing it to build his career, not mine. This isn’t something I’m trying to expand for myself.

 


Right now you are finishing “The Box”. How long have you been working on this project?

We started shooting “The Box” in December 2012. I started writing it in August or September. It all started when I moved from Los Angeles back to St. Louis in July of that year. Dave Rutherford, a cinematographer who I have been friends with and have worked with since I first started making

The Box Trailer

The Box by Doveed Linder

movies, suggested that we make a short film together. I wrote an 18-page script called “The Box” and started passing it around for feedback. Somebody suggested to me that I take this idea and make a feature film – an anthology consisting of 3 or 4 stories, where this mysterious box is used as a link from story to story. That’s how it took off. We shot one of the stories in December and I started writing the other stories in 2013. I had no idea how we would pull this off. But I figured with an anthology format, we could start and stop as we go along without having to worry about significant continuity issues along the way. Starting and stopping over a three year period is a tough way to make a movie, but we’re finally seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.Doveed and Stephanie

You had a previous production that made it to market, Can you elaborate on that, what it was about, and how people can watch a clip or teaser trailer?

That movie was an action/western movie called “Defiance”, which was picked up by Lionsgate Films. That was my first feature film and my only other feature besides “The Box”. Like “The Box”, it was a long process with a lot of starting and stopping. It was a very raw effort because I was so young and inexperienced, but it was a great accomplishment for everyone involved. I’m probably more proud of that movie that I will be of any other movie I make from here on out. It was a massive first film in that it was set in the 1800’s, and we were working with horses, guns, special effects, hundreds of extras, etc. It was so demanding on everyone who worked on it and I have such a huge appreciation for everyone I met on that movie. If you want to see it, Google “Defiance 2002” and I’m sure you’ll find something.

“I just wrote a boxing book, which will end up being a series of books, so I’ll probably be working on that for the next few years.”

What are your plans with boxing and movie making? Can you balance the two at the same time? Which one are you most passionate about?

Like I mentioned, I’m training just one boxer and my involvement, as a trainer will depend on his interest and level of commitment. Right now, he’s taking a very professional approach, so I am as well. I just wrote a boxing book, which will end up being a series of books, so I’ll probably be working on that for the next few years. But movies have always been the thing I’m most passionate about. First and foremost, I need to finish “The Box”. I have a few other projects ready to go to when “The Box” is finished. My plan is to get those movies made and keep going with it. When I first started making movies, I was having a lot of success. We made “Defiance” and followed it up with a Stephen King adaptation called “Strawberry Spring”

Strawberry Spring

Strawberry Spring by Doveed Linder

which was screened at the Cannes Film Festival. At some point, I hit a wall with filmmaking. I didn’t have the resources to do the things I wanted to do and I didn’t know what angle to take. Around this time, the boxing thing started showing up in my life. I kept trying to get my movie career off the ground, but boxing is where I found the open doors. Boxing has been good to me. It’s a sport that has really shaped me as a person. Here I am 15 years after I made my first feature and I’m finally working on another one. I’m back on track to make movies again and I now have this second career with boxing. As far as how I balance the two, I just find ways to make it work. The boxer I train came out one day to help me with “The Box”. I read that day that we might be fighting in three weeks, so we started training right there on the sound stage.

Tell me about the life of a boxing trainer. What does somebody like that do: the sacrifice, the commitment, the challenge? What does it feel like in the moment when you watch your protégé fight?

In a way, being a boxing trainer is a lot like being a film director. I spend a lot of time daydreaming. I develop a vision for what I want, but there has to be flexibility in that vision because it’s a collaborative process. Fighters, like actors, cinematographers, musicians, etc., are all unique and bring something to the table that a trainer or a director never counted on. Trainers and directors both have to study their craft and follow the history, as well as the evolution of it. My feelings about the actual fight are similar to the way I feel about going onto the location to shoot. It’s not my favorite part of the process. I kind of just want to get it over with. The real stimulation comes with the planning. In the ring or on the shooting location, there are often variables that you never counted on, so you have to be able to think on the fly.

What’s should we look for from Doveed Linder in the future, and how can we follow you?

The book I referred to is called “Boxing: The Modern Era, Vol. 1 (24 Interviews with the People of the Sport)”. It’s a collection of interviews with various people in the boxing world – the fighters, trainers, promoters, officials, etc., from the Muhammad Ali era all the way to the present. It was picked up by McFarland Publishers and will be out in the near future. “The Box” will be finished this year and I look forward to marketing it for distribution. The boxer I train, Raymond

Sweat GymHandson, is making his professional boxing debut at Lumiere Casino on February 20th. I hope for a successful night and that he keeps moving forward with his career and doing good things. Most of all, I look forward to the next movie after “The Box”. There are a few different possibilities and we’ll see how it unfolds. As far as how to follow me, I’m on Facebook, or you can book a session with me at Sweat gym in St. Louis, where I work as a personal trainer and a boxing instructor. Sweat has been a huge source of support. They give me a chance to make a living and also give me the freedom to pursue my other interests.

Midwest Filmmaker Profile: Dan Steadman

in Midwest Filmmaking Profile/Pop Culture by
web1_proximity-FOR_JUMP

Midwest Filmmaker Profile: Dan Steadman

by Scott Michael Dunn @scottmdunn

BMnYw2S2

Dan Steadman: shaking up the community with his focus to develop, drive, and promote talent in the Midwest. Hollywood certainly gets most of the credit when it comes to filmmaking, with New York following close behind and Atlanta determined to catch up. But Steadman fully believes that the St. Louis metropolitan area is a perfect location for sitcoms, movies, and live theater. Not only is he talking this talk, but there is no doubt that Dan Steadman has dedicated his talent, passion, and career to walking the Midwest walk.  After moving here from LA, he developed a substantial following and became determined to give back to this community by providing opportunities for actors to fulfill their dreams. For example, his movies, Belleville and Proximity, saw the casts walking a red carpet for their respective premiers and being interviewed by local radio and TV stations. Fortunately, for the multitudes of acting talent in this area, this will happen again! Steadman has developed workshops that will provide not only in-depth guidance in the acting craft, but also opportunities for future roles.

Steadman founded Circa87, and actors can enroll in talent workshops available every Saturday for the next few months, and gather more information about additional opportunities at www.circa87.com. Steadman shared his personal story with us:

How long have you been in the industry? What kept you pushing forward and did you have immediate success?

I’ve been in the industry since 1987 – just about 30 years, which seems like a long time for someone who’s only in his early 40s. But I started as a teenager, producing TV in Michigan. Originally I was in front of the camera, as a clown. The next series I did, I started to hide behind puppets. By my third project, I quickly learned that storytelling was my drive. I quickly lost the performance bug and started to fall in love with discovering talent and putting it on screen. Writing and directing became my passion, and still is, nearly 30 years later.

How do you support your projects financially when it seems the toughest battle in this industry is funding?

That is the toughest battle. I think the secret is to devote far more time marketing than doing the “fun” stuff. I hate marketing, but part of being a professional is to do the things you hate doing. This year, the acting classes I’m teaching for six months will help fund the sitcom and the movie I’m shooting this year in the Midwest.

images

How do you feel about the talent available locally?

I moved here from Los Angeles due to the high quality of talent here. My first film, “Belleville,” starred St. Louis actress Cooper Show. I hired her off of her fantastic demo reel, even without an audition. She killed the part of the antagonist in that film, and was rewarded in Beverly Hills with a Best Supporting Actress win at the American Movie Awards for her role in our film. Another actor in “Belleville” is Antonio St. James. He was a new actor with a magnetic talent. He came in and auditioned for me at a banjo shop in New Athens, IL (no joke – I didn’t have an office for casting, so the fine folks at the Bluegrass Shack) let me use their space. Antonio was immediately written into my film and he has since gone on to book speaking roles in the film “Gone Girl” and on top notch TV shows “Empire,” “Chicago PD” and “Shameless.” That’s the kind of talent we have here. It was enough to make me move.

What’s the newest project and do you have a teaser for us to promote it?

The latest project is “Proximity,” which is continuing to roll out in theaters across the Midwest. It’s a romantic comedy we shot in St. Louis, Belleville, and Centralia, IL. I’m very proud of it. It was a stage play I wrote in Los Angeles about eight years ago with my writing partner Rajeev Sigamoney. I’m so glad we’ve finally gotten the chance to turn it into a movie.

What role did you play in Belleville, Proximity, and now the newest project in motion?

I wrote and directed “Belleville.” I directed and co-wrote “Proximity” with Rajeev Sigamoney and will be writing this Fall’s movie with him, as well. I’m flying out to California in May to finish it with him. Then I’ll be directing that film in September, with actors from my 2016 Actor’s Workshop.

How are you recruiting talent for these projects

We’ve auditioned 1300 people in the Midwest and over 400 of them have landed roles. Now it’s time to focus on those who are the most serious. That’s, in part, why I started the acting workshop. I want to devote my time and attention to actors who really want to make a go of this profession. If they are willing to come to a weekly class on Saturday for six months, I want to invest in them and make sure everyone gets some kind of speaking role in the Fall movie.

Most importantly, how did you get Adam W. to play a role in Proximity – baseball to the movies isn’t unheard of but I bet that played a role in increasing your audience?

Our producer Kathy Kaiser knew his family, and that’s how we approached the Wainwrights. The whole family was part of it — his daughters, his wife, and even his then-unborn daughter (if you squint really hard). Yes, getting a celebrity on board always helps, of course. That’s how our culture is rigged. I used to make TV pilots and films with famous folks (Melissa McCarthy, Octavia Spencer, Sean Hayes, etc) and that excites audiences. But really, a good performance is a good performance – whether it comes from a famous person or an unknown. Just look at Antonio and Cooper! (previous answer)

How does it feel to have your projects play with all the lights and red carpet. I’ve seen some of the pics of wide grinned, local talent but it must feel like an accomplishment to have a full house and a big screen presentation?

A full house is certainly an accomplishment, of course. The marketing of all that is challenging for me — exhausting, even. But for me, the red carpet premiere events are thrilling for two reasons. I get to tell a story to a willing audience. That’s a near-impossible feat in this day and age, with the fractured audience consuming media, with everyone on their cell phones, and with attention spans at an all-time low. The second great joy of a screening is watching all these deserving Midwesterners walk a red carpet, all glammed up, and get their much-deserving moment in the spotlight. Watching people have so much fun and feeling special makes all the behind-the-scenes effort, worth it.

For more info check out Circa87

Follow on twitter here.

If you like this then check out Always Late TV.

 

 

 

 

 

 

B. Clay Moore’s Big Hawaiian Dick

in Pop Culture by
BYRD OF PARADISE PINUP Lo Res

by Scott Michael Dunn @scottmdunn

B. Clay Moore has spent the last ten plus years working his Hawaiian Dick formula and finally, after all the effort, it looks like these comics are about to hit Prime Time.

FINAL

After years of writing and promoting, a recent pitch to NBC has met with the first level of Prime Time success. As stated by Moore, “Right now the writers, Dave Elliott and Paul Lovett, are working on the pilot script, and progress seems positive.” Positive indeed as the pitch was made possible with the combined efforts of Moore and producer Eric Gitter. As we all look forward to the developments of the pilot episode, there is more to share. A 100 page graphic novel was launched on Kickstarter and raised $20,794 with 684 backers. With all of these exciting developments, we decided to be dicks ourselves and investigate the man behind the comic.

As a child, Moore moved around a lot and developed a fondness for comics at an early age.  While this seems no different than the likes of many children, Moore had a special talent for farce; he was enough off-kilter that he gained reader interest at an early age. He continued to develop this craft until finally, as a college student in Kansas City, KS, Moore found himself at a proverbial crossroads while studying journalism.  He was battling the realization that his dream of producing comics was far-fetched and humility was in order. However, he decided his creative and entrepreneurial venture deserved one more chance and reached out to Joseph Torres.

According to Moore, the selection of comics at that time was a poor replication of the art and the industry was slowly creeping to a halt.  While Moore was disappointed with the comic industry at that time, he was inspired by the work of J. Torres  (known recently for “Teen Titan Go”).  As it turns out, their chance encounter was a comedy of errors. Moore was expected to do graphic work for Torres and ended up editing the entire book, “Comic Book Tales.” Torres was impressed with his work, which created a long-standing relationship. In the mid 90s (post college), Moore resorted to sales to stay afloat. He was talented and gained attention, but he was not willing to sacrifice his ideas for success. His goal was to be different enough to garner attention, yet remain in the mainstream in order to entertain the masses.

finalmokks

Moore spent a number of years with Image Comics in and out of production with his Hawaiian Dick comic ideas.  Since Image Comics was not changing comics to fit the industry, they were hard pressed to find quick success however, Moore became a big part of developing their successful brand.  This led the author to New Line Cinema in early 2002, and the two entities (New Line Cinema and Moore) struck an agreement to bring Hawaiian Dick to life on the silver screen.  The project was ready for a green light, but New Line Cinema began experiencing financial difficulties so the movie was unable to be produced. However, when the plans for the movie were moving forward, Johnny Knoxville was secured as the star. Even though that project didn’t see completion, Moore knew that, with the big name agreeing to portray his star character, he definitely had a marketable product.

That product has now developed into a potential TV series that NBC is interested in airing. Incidentally, if the pilot is picked up, Knoxville will still be cast in the starring role. We asked Moore to highlight his career in comics and he shared these thoughts: “The immediate success of Hawaiian Dick was hard to top. It was the first thing I’d done on my own, and its extremely positive reception really motivated me. Beyond that, having the opportunity to write characters like Superman and Batman was fun. I don’t know what writer wouldn’t love to tell at least one story for each of those guys. But I find creating my own worlds and characters to be the most enjoyable aspect of what I do. I’ve recently had the chance to introduce some new characters to existing comic book universes, and that’s been a lot of fun, as well.”

So who exaclty will Johnny Knoxville be portraying? The original “Hawaiian Dick” comic was a reflection of Hawaii circa the 1950s.  Hawaii was gaining interest as a popular destination and there was a specific culture that began to develop during this decade.  After watching a film about a band of apparitions that moved around and danced to drum beats, the author was also inspired to add a supernatural aspect to his writing. However, he was hell bent that Byrd was not to become a cliché ghost hunter.  Byrd is a sort of dim-witted private dick that tends to muck things up as well as he solves mysteries (enter the quintessential Johnny Knoxville characters we know and love).

ahd1_01-1

Moore attributes his growing success to his followers, and is humbly grateful for the contributions to his Kickstarter campaign. When he was determining how to set a pace for the release of “Big Hawaiian Dick,” “Aloha, from Hawaiian Dick,” and the TV series, he decided to use Kickstarter to launch the marketing for all of his Hawaiian Dick endeavors.  This campaign brought all of these projects together by building a single platform, which launched him directly onto his current path. “Big Hawaiian Dick” is a compilation of unpublished material, art, and original work from the “Hawaiian Dick” comic.  This 100 page book has collectable artwork and never before seen content.  The crowd-funding marketing concept seemed to align with his ideas for simultaneously promoting his work.

Obviously, it was the right decision with the amount that was raised and the number of backers he received. The Great Big Hawaiian Dick graphic novel will not be available anywhere else according to Moore.  He merged exclusively with Kickstarter in order to streamline his process.  Rather than an overload of pricey merchandise, the collaboration is only offering this 100 page content driven representation of his comic.  When asked what Moore thought of his decision to launch this campaign on Kickstarter, he said, “I’m very gratified. There aren’t a lot of high dollar rewards as part of the campaign, so reaching our goal so quickly felt great. The main thing I wanted to do was get the book into people’s hands. As of right now, we have just over 500 backers, with the rest of the week to go.”

After discussing his success on Kickstarter even further, Moore had this to share: “I think it’s a fantastic way to put things directly into the hands of readers and consumers. You know the book is going to be read, and you know how many people are going to read it. In this case, we won’t be overprinting the book by much, and won’t be reprinting it in this format, so this is honestly the most likely way for people to buy the book.”

ALOHAF

Moore’s public is excited to see the series and is anxiously awaiting the partnering comic, “Aloha, from Hawaiian Dick.” Considering Moore has been creating this series of comics for many years, he had a huge amount of content to work with.  He decided, rather than start a whole new series that may or may not take away from the original, he would create a sister project entitled “Aloha, Hawaiian Dick.” The idea for the Aloha series was to hold hands with the original “Hawaiian Dick” and be more of an attributing story rather than a fresh one.

Moore currently resides in Kansas City, KS and spends his time developing new projects while keeping up with the Comic-Con scene.  He is launching “Aloha, Hawaiian Dick” into production with artists like Shawn Dove and Greg Smallwood, the artists who are working on the covers.  Moore shared that “Southern Bastards,” a recent release for Image Comics, is his favorite book on the market right now.

In a recent discussion with Word Balloon, a comic book conversation show, John Siuntres interviewed Moore and he shared another project he launched in 2013 called Bad Karma, which is a 200 page hardcover comic. With all the hype for Dick and Aloha, Hawaiian Dick, Bad Karma is gaining lots of support too. 615 supporters pledged $36,262 towards the project.  It seems that Moore is on top of his game and gathering steam along the way.  Do not be surprised to read, hear, or see B. Clay Moore on the forefront of entertainment news and Comic-Con events.

If you like this article check out our interview with Troy Little who adapted the Hunter S. Thompson classic Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas into a graphic novel.

 

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